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Jan. 7, 2022

The Pursuit of PhD Excellence and “The Things I Wish I Knew Before I Started” with Dr Natalie Baucum

The Pursuit of PhD Excellence and “The Things I Wish I Knew Before I Started” with Dr Natalie Baucum

Dr. Baucum is a professor who teaches marketing-focused courses to undergraduates and Master of Business Administration (MBA) students. She specializes in working with businesses and organizations that either are owned by black, Indigenous and People of ...


Dr. Baucum is a professor who teaches marketing-focused courses to undergraduates and Master of Business Administration (MBA) students. She specializes in working with businesses and organizations that either are owned by black, Indigenous and People of Color (BIPOC) and/or serve BIPOC. Dr. Baucum conducts quantitative research focused on understanding how brand symbols influence the consumption behaviors and habits of BIPOC.

 

The pursuit of PhD excellence begins the moment you choose to apply to your program and continues until you walk across the stage at your graduation ceremony, and beyond! In this episode, we speak with Dr. Natalie Baucum about her experience obtaining her doctorate and how she uses this experience to support BIPOC students who are making the same journey in their own lives.

 

Being a woman in STEM and getting over imposter syndrome (IS) Impostor syndrome is a term coined by two American psychologists, Pauline Rose Clance and Suzanne Imes. In 1978 they were the first to study the phenomenon in high-achieving women. As such, it is also known as the impostor phenomenon (IP). Women affected by IP experience persistent feelings of intellectual fraudulence. This feeling can affect their academic or professional careers, their self-perception, and their interactions with others (for example students). They have an intense fear that if other people know about their true level of ability, that they will no longer be seen as successful. It has been suggested that the frequency at which impostorism affects women makes it both a significant and understudied problem for girls' achievement. Although the majority of research into the topic has focused on women, IS does not appear to be gender-specific; prevalence amongst men has been reported too. Additionally, the concept is increasingly being used to describe a broader range of experiences than originally defined by Clance and Imes. Studies indicate that between 70% and 95% of all people have experienced the impostor phenomenon sometime during their lives. It has been found to impact school performance, work productivity, interpersonal relationships, job satisfaction and mental health.

 

Getting involved in social justice issues while pursuing your PhD We often feel that our PhD work is a solitary enterprise, but it doesn’t have to be. In fact, your academic work can inspire others. It can make a difference in the lives of your peers and colleagues in the university community as well as people outside of it.   However, getting involved isn’t something you do on the side; social justice issues are very much intertwined with the process of being a scholar. Getting involved isn’t just an extra-curricular activity—it’s integral to who we are as academics and members of society.

 

Dealing with being Black in academia and facing racism in your department/thesis committee Being a person of color in academia is an experience unlike any other. In fact, it can be summed up in one word: racism. This experience varies greatly from individual to individual, yet all POC share some similar struggles when entering a predominantly white academic environment. One of the most difficult aspects is dealing with racism as an integral part of your university experience. Oftentimes, issues pertaining to race are never discussed or acknowledged for fear that people would think less of you for being Black/Latino/Asian/Gay/Transgender (insert identity here). However, how do we address problems in our communities if they aren’t acknowledged? If you are pursuing a PhD in the Sciences or Engineering, chances are your department or thesis committee is predominantly white. How then do you deal with being black in academia and facing racism in your department/thesis committee? Here is my personal approach based on my own experiences and observations as a black woman who has been involved in higher education for over a decade. It may not work for everyone, but perhaps sharing these insights might help others deal with their unique situation. 

 

At SouthernSoulLiveStream.com - Show & Music Hangout we cover a variety of topics, this week we’re hosting an episode for scholars, researchers, students, academics, and lifelong learners.

 

Connect with Dr. Natalie Baucum

  • Website: https://www.linkedin.com/in/thepolymathicprofessor/
  • Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thepolymathicprofessor/

 

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